Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands
Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands

Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands
Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands

Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands
Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands

Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands
Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands

Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands
Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands

Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands
Floating Pavilion //Rotterdam, Netherlands

Visionary ideas in times of climate change

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DERECO Impuls 6

Combatting water, living with water.

Considering certain global trends such as urbanisation, disastrous weather events and migration from dangerous parts of the world, there’s an unsolved problem of finding sufficient safe and affordable space for people to live and work in. If we want to create new space, we need to think outside the box and create innovative, sustainable projects.

One meaningful approach could be to develop and build what is known as “floating cities” – constructions floating on water which can be compounded into relatively small settlements or even larger urban structures.

The rationale for planning floating cities is quite convincing:
• Floating houses and cities don’t require any expensive ground
• They protect those who live in them against floods, inundation and the consequences of a rising sea level
• They can provide additional residential space in overcrowded cities and offer refugees a new home.


Floating Pavilion · Rotterdam, Netherlands

For centuries, the Dutch have invented effective solutions to prevent the disastrous effects of floods – no wonder floating homes have been built there for a very long time. A more recent case in point was the installation of a “floating pavilion” in Rotterdam’s inland harbour in 2013, an outstanding example of innovative, sustainable architecture to meet the challenges associated with climate change. The pavilion was developed as a showcase project for the city of Rotterdam. The 8,000-sqm space hosts an exhibition about Rotterdam’s agenda for adapting to climate change. It’s a useful venue for events with up to 1,000 guests. The huge floating support structure of the pavilion was made of styrofoam. The entire construction is connected to pontoons. Two wide bridges connect the island with the mainland. Rotterdam’s showcase project was developed by a Dutch company called Deltasync. The support structure was designed by William Roël, who works with the FlexBase construction company.