Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands
Kruisheren Hotel // Maastricht, Netherlands

Innovative re-design for historic buildings

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DERECO Impuls 4

Don’t we all know how marvellous it feels to take a stroll through the hearts of old cities, where every stone breathes history?

Narrow lanes and historic buildings represent the past and origins of a city more than anything, making each place as unique and genuine as it is. But even away from city centres, ancient and impressive monuments to the past have left their mark on their surroundings. However, such buildings might entail complicated challenges: often, they don’t meet today’s standards for economic efficiency and modern technology, and their idiosyncratic design can also pose problems. As a rule, owners and investors have to decide whether to pull down buildings or put them to good use after a series of painstaking refurbishment activities (“adaptive re-use” is the cue).

There are numerous reasons for changing a building’s function substantially. Doing so can preserve a unique building or a whole complex, the rooms and the historic surroundings. When preserving instead of demolishing the old bricks and mortar, the historic value of such assets comes into play just as much as the social value for the community and the concept of sustainability. Palaces, castles, churches, schools, local councils and factories live on as walk-in witnesses of history. Conservation can go in parallel with developing novel, extraordinary space for living and working. Rural and urban areas also benefit as they experience new development momentum.


Kruisheren Hotel · Maastricht, The Netherlands

The 15th-century Monastery of the Order of the Holy Cross is located in central Maastricht. Uninhabited since 1979, the building and the adjacent Gothic church were then carefully restored by Camille Ostwegel. It was given a new life when it reopened its doors in 2005, converted into a design hotel with a stunning atmosphere and some casual, out-of-the-ordinary interior design. The hotel offers a beautiful quiet garden right in the heart of the city. And an art exhibition. And terraces. And shops.

The internationally renowned interior designer Henk Vos created an individual contemporary interior with an air of transparency, lots of lofty space and comfort. Classics by Le Corbusier, Rietveld in juxtaposition to today’s designers’ works form an intriguing contrast with the leadlights, walls and ceilings with their historic paint cover. A host of innovative design ideas was born in this symbiosis of Middle Ages and modernity, one highlight being the glass lift connecting the church nave with the monastery. This complex consists of a mere six rooms – the reception, a conference room, a library, a boutique, a restaurant and a wine bar. From the newly built mezzanine floor, where breakfast is served, guests can look through the windows by the pulpit onto the bustle of Maastricht’s lively streets.