Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany
Pumpwerk Neukölln // Berlin, Germany

Conservation of a buildings character

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DERECO Impuls 4

This building was erected in 1925/1926 as an extension to a pumping station built on the site in 1893. It was taken out of use in 1993. Only one old vessel has been left as a reminder of the steam engine technology it used to house. The old pumping station was first listed as a monument of national interest in 1989. It was disused for thirteen long years when suddenly, artists Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset fell in love with it. Supported by Wenk und Wiese Architekten, they converted it into their home, studio and gallery.

The two visual artists laid high store by preserving the building’s original character. With only a few moderate interventions, this monument to early industry was converted into a unique modern home and an arts space fit for the needs of the new residents.

The studio in the middle of the house and the gallery were built inside the former engine room of the waterworks. A high vertical window structure allows for a view of old walnut trees outside. It’s a spacious room, flooded by light, which features dark roof tiles, whitewashed walls and a new concrete floor painted black. Mobile platforms that can be shifted across the hall create working space as required without any adverse effect on the gallery where works of art are presented, most of which are three-dimensional. A conference room was created next to the working area. On the upper floors, one load-bearing wall was removed and replaced by new concrete pillars to match the existing structure. This resulted in large rooms where the artists live. As the ceiling was reinforced, even the attic can now be fully used. With the existing steel construction and new transversal elements connected to the load-bearing wall, a long, high room stretching from the northern to the southern end of the roof was created. With a large roof window, which opens vertically to the side, this lounge has become an attractive internal rooftop terrace.