Cliff House by Modscape // Australia
Cliff House by Modscape // Australia

Cliff House by Modscape // Australia
Cliff House by Modscape // Australia

Cliff House by Modscape // Australia
Cliff House by Modscape // Australia

Cliff House by Modscape // Australia
Cliff House by Modscape // Australia

Cliff House by Modscape // Australia
Cliff House by Modscape // Australia

Cliff House by Modscape // Australia
Cliff House by Modscape // Australia

Cliff House by Modscape // Australia
Cliff House by Modscape // Australia

Cliff House by Modscape // Australia
Cliff House by Modscape // Australia

Visionary architecture - In harmony with nature

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DERECO Impuls 1

Sustainability is no catchphrase – it implies a paradigm shift that affects all areas of life.
Visionary architects and innovative project developers understood this long ago. They have come up with completely new, modern and spectacular sustainable building concepts for living and working.

Houses that do not just stand somewhere in a natural setting but blend into it harmoniously are enjoying more and more popularity and attention. Renewable, sustainable materials for construction and fittings have been used increasingly for innovative house concepts. These houses have their own power and water supply systems. Concepts like this rely on material cycles similar to natural ones – up to 98% of input materials are recycled, no waste is produced (cradle-to-cradle approach). Direct interaction with nature is a clear focus; it’s all about creating things from Mother Nature’s force and beauty without harming her. Let us look at four spectacular house concepts: these houses were built in extraordinary harmony with nature. They hang, they’re engulfed or they float.

Rafflesia House by Zoka Zola
Zero-energy house in the tropics, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Winner of the Bird Island Competition 2007.

This concept was developed for an international competition (topic: zero energy housing). The task was to create buildings that would function in harmony with the environment, consist of renewable/recyclable materials and have their own energy household and a closed water cycle. Rafflesia House is a perfect mix as it provides a connection with nature while at the same time offering shelter from it (plants, rain, animals, sun, wind, heat/cold). The energy required by the house is generated by a photovoltaic system covering 92% of the roof area. The house is adapted to its given location and the natural conditions it has to withstand. It’s higher on one side so the wind is deflected by open doors and windows. The air gap between the lower and upper roofs insulates the inside from heat.

Cliff House by Modscape
Australia, 2014

Cliff House is a theoretical answer by Modscape Concept to clients asking for construction concepts on extreme sites along the Australian coast. The house is built in such a way that it seems to cling to the rock like barnacles to a ship. Cliff House was intended to form a natural extension of the cliff and connect the building with the sea, the only vertical landside link being the entrance through the carport. A lift takes you to the lower four floors where a living room, kitchen, three bedrooms, bathrooms and a small spa (ground floor) and a small barbecue corner are located. Modscape’s work is based on four principles of sustainability: design, materials, system and operation. Their houses are built in line with sustainability principles such as minimal environmental impact (and minimal resource usage) and low operating costs (water recycling and rain water collection). A pleasant room climate is ensured throughout the year through passive cooling and heating.